Tuesday, July 14, 2009

365 - 43: Krista Blossoms

This spring when Krista came over and made dinner for convalescing me, she brought a butternut squash from the past autumn. When she cut it open, we saw its seeds had started to sprout inside. I planted some of them in pots on the porch, and this morning appeared the first of their blossoms.


Krista is blossoming too, and growing right out of her pot--having finished her PhD, she's off to take up her first professorial post in a couple weeks. I'll miss her. I'll have to mail her a squash...

[365, all together]

7 comments:

Rudyinparis said...

Great photo! You look like a Cabbage Patch Kid. Um, a Cabbage Patch adult. A Butternut Squash Patch Adult.

Fresca said...

LOL! Thanks.
I admit I cheated--I had the most tremendous bags under my eyes this morning, which drove to me figure out how to use the "retouch" tool...
Otherwise I'd look like the Butternut Squash Patch Allergy Sufferer.

momo said...

wow, giganto-squash! And what a lovely image of Krista flowering.

Jennifer said...

This one and the cherry one go so well together as lush, fruitful and flowering images. Perfect for the season. I love them a lot!

Krista Kennedy said...

You! This totally stopped me in my tracks. Blossoming seems like a lovely way to describe this process, which is awesome but also a little scary and painful.

Thank you.

fresca said...

Thanks, all.

Jen: I actually took these photos on the same day--we are heading into high fruitfulness season, and the farmers market is full of home-grown stuff finally.

Hee, hee, Krista! I've stumbled on a reference to myself on someone else's blog and been extra delighted because I didn't expect it.
I'm a little uncertain these will produce actual squash in their little porch pots,
but I have no doubt YOU will! Scary and painful. Sounds about right.

Nancy said...

Beautiful yellow squash blossom light on your face.

Because you like such things I mention that the traditional hairdo of maidens among some pueblo Indians of the southwest was called "squash blossom". You can see why when you know what each looks like. Also, only maidens, unmarried women, wore the style -- they had not fruited yet.