Friday, April 16, 2010

SFX

Thank you all for making my blog interesting this week, confessing things you've stolen. (Amazing the libraries have any books left at all!)

I'm not much for blog writing right now:
the verbal part of my brain is otherwise occupied, trying to fit together the puzzle pieces of colonial America.

Inside my head, the madness-inducing process (because of the mercury fumes) of making beaver-felt hats is bumping up against
the demographics of 1750 Virginia (almost half and half Euro- and African-American);
French Papists are handing out rosaries to Indians, and Indians are cutting off gun barrels to make flutes;
colonial women camp followers are washing soldier's linen,
and soldiers are eating parched corn--what does that taste like?

Aaargh. How am I going to pull this all together into a short book for kids?!

Luckily blogging isn't all writing--we have pictures 'n' stuff.
So, here're a couple simple-minded things that make me happy.

I. Slicing an Orange (23 sec.)

I love special effects made with everyday objects. Here, I slowed down the knife sharpening.
Listen: when the blade hits the steel,
you can hear why the orange stands no chance at all.



II. SFX = Shatner Effects

I'm still learning blogging tricks.
Jen recently told me how to post large images on blogspot: upload them from a photo-hosting site on the web. (I've always loaded them from my computer.)
So, I finally set up an account on Photobucket. Today I'm trying that tip...
OK, yeah, it works.

Now I just need to figure out how to get my blog banner to stretch out to fill the space behind the title. Do you know?



I found these Star Trek Special Effects among thousands of images on Zainin666's William Shatner Album. They were originally culled from Star Trek History, which has tons of good stuff about the show's production.

Six more Shatner SFX are on my account.

7 comments:

Clowncar said...

Indians cutting off gun barrels to make flutes sounds like a book in itself.

Seen this? From the Paramount Studios library:
http://www.jessicastover.com/galleries/1/kirkswomen.jpg

Fresca said...

Yes, the stuff people did with each other's trade goods is fascinating in itself.

The Indians thought it was weird that the Europeans loved their old, worn beaver fur coats.
The thing was, the wear had rubbed off the guard hairs, so it was easier for hatters to get at the underlying coat which is what they used to make felt for hats...

It all makes my head swim.
But a folder of Kirk's Women
makes perfect sense. : )

Lill said...

Definitely put in the gun barrel flutes. All gun barrels should be made into flutes, yes?

Also, it is the only info of those bits you mentioned that I'd not heard of and would have been hooked by as a kid.

LOVE the slicing an orange video! Terrific sounds and ends with a Dutch still-life composition. Noyce.

Margaret said...

I have a hard enough time trying to fit the panorama of a given period in History into my brain when I'm just listening. I can't imagine writing it.

The knife sharpening, birdie print in the background: I am relieved it is only an orange. (But an orange! And it's fruit-kin waiting helplessly in the wings!)

The last Shat picture on your SFX: Oh!
"jaws, and the
jaw-hinges,
Nose, nostrils,
and the partition,
Cheeks,
temples"

Fresca said...

CLOWN: Well, after I told you I'd deleted both your comments, one reappeared...
Such are the mysteries of Blogger.
Thanks!

LiLL: It is a cool fact, isn't it? They also cut up metal kettles and the like to use as jewelry and fishing lures, etc.
Hail the malleability of the physical world--and the human imagination.

M'GET: You're right, it's a regular fruit slaughter goes into fruit salad.

I found Zainin's Shatner album through you! (Wonderful stuff, but all out of order...)
Yes, isn't that a pretty angle on the Captain's profile? Walt would swoon.

bink said...

I think the sound on the orange film would work great for a new film on the beheading of Mary of Queen of Scots... or a really tough scalping job...

deanna said...

Entertaining post and comments.
I appreciate knowing about the large pictures!